Canadian Immigration News

Reduced Barriers for Disabled Immigrants: Medical Inadmissibility

1.75 minute read
"The Canadian government updated the rules for medical inadmissibility to make it more accessible to disabled people. Given that the existing medical inadmissibility rules were over 40 years old and not in line with the current Canadian values."
Written by My Visa Source Team
Published on:  Jun 8, 2021
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The Canadian government updated the rules for medical inadmissibility to make it more accessible to disabled people. Given that the existing medical inadmissibility rules were over 40 years old and not in line with the current Canadian values. 

The government decided to raise the cost threshold for medical inadmissibility. This change is expected to reduce immigration refusals based on mental and physical disabilities. 

Earlier, there were cases where foreign nationals with disabilities like Down syndrome were also rejected. However, this new rule is expected to do away with a significant amount of immigration refusals based on disabilities. 

What Are the New Changes Being Introduced for Medical Inadmissibility?

The new definition for medical inadmissibility will remove references to special educational, social, and vocational rehabilitation services and personal support services. The government has also updated the cost threshold by three times. This means that foreign nationals with relatively minor health conditions that will put a low-cost effect on the health and social services of Canada will be eligible for permanent residence in Canada. This includes people with hearing or visual impairments. 

According to the new changes, the cost threshold for a medical condition will be considered excessive if it is more than 3 times the average per capita expenditure of a Canadian on health and social services. The average per capita expenditure was estimated at $7,068 last year. This means that a medical condition must not cost the health and social services more than $21,000 annually to be considered admissible.

Why Were These Changes Necessary?

Every year, over 1,000 foreign nationals were being affected by the previous medical inadmissibility rules. These new changes are expected to bring down that number significantly. Since there have been repeated calls from several organizations to repeal the existing policy, these changes are expected to be welcomed.

The previous regulations affected the applicants and their accompanying family members as it led to refusals even if their medical condition could be readily accommodated in Canada. The new policy is expected to bring a balance in Canada’s vision to be more inclusive without putting too much pressure on health and social services. 

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